A Word Problems Worksheet - by HelpingWithMath.com

Multi-Step Word Problems Worksheet

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Reteach: Multi-Step Word Problems

In multi-step word problems, one or more problems have to be solved in order to get the information needed to solve the question being asked.

The danger with this type of problem is thinking that you have reached your answer after solving only the first part of the problem, and stopping too soon.

Before rushing to solve the problem, it is worth your time to slow down and clarify your understanding. Be sure you know what is being asked, what you already know from the problem, and what you need to know in order to solve the question being asked.

 

 

Reteach: Guided Practice

Let's look at a simple multi-step problem:

Cindy had 18 pieces of candy. She ate six pieces in the morning, and four more pieces in the afternoon. How many pieces of candy does she have left?

Start by clarifying what you understand, and what you are being asked to solve.

  • 18 pieces is the total amount of candy. 
  • Six pieces is the amount  she eats in the morning.
  • Four pieces is the amount she eats in the afternoon.
  • “How many pieces of candy does she have left?” is the question being asked.

Start by adding together 6 + 4 to find the total candies eaten: 10.

Don’t be fooled into stopping there. The question being asked is “how many are left?” not “how many are eaten?”.  Take the final step of subtracting the total eaten, 10, from the total candies, 18.  Since 18 – 10 = 8, Cindy has 8 pieces left.

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Independent Practice: Multi-Step Word Problems

Solve each problem below. Clarify what you know, and what you need to know to solve the question being asked. Solve the first step to get the rest of the information you need. Use that information to solve the second step that gives you the final answer. Check and make sure your answer is reasonable.

Jerry had a box of 64 crayons. He lost eight of them, and his little sister broke three of them. How many crayons does Jerry have left?

Step One:   8 + 3 = 11   

Step Two:   64 - 11 = 53   

Jerry has    53    crayons left. Since the problem tells two ways that Jerry lost some crayons, he should have less crayons than he started out with. Is your answer reasonable?

 

Samantha and Krystal have twenty minutes to walk to school together. It takes them six minutes to get to the corner where the library is. It takes them another seven minutes to get to the fire station. How much longer do they have to get to school without being late?

Step One:   6 + 7 = 13   

Step Two:   20 - 13 = 7   

They have   7   minutes left. Since the problem tells two amounts of time that the girls use up while walking, the amount they have left should be less than the amount of time they started with. Is your answer reasonable?

 

Robert wants to practice goal kicks for soccer. He decides to have 12 kicks before going home from the park. He takes 5 kicks before taking a break to get a drink of water. He  then takes another 4 kicks. How many more kicks does he need to make before he goes home?

Step One:   5 + 4 = 9   

Step Two:   12 - 9 = 3  

He still needs to take    3   kicks. Since the problem tells two amounts of kicks that he  has already made, the amount  of kicks he has left should be less than the amount of kicks he needed to take in the beginning. Is your answer reasonable?

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Independent Practice: Multi-Step Word Problems

Solve each problem below. Clarify what you know, and what you need to know to solve the question being asked. Solve the first step to get the rest of the information you need. Use that information to solve the second step that gives you the final answer. Check and make sure your answer is reasonable.

Ashleigh runs 2 miles on Monday and three times that many on Tuesday. If she wants to run a total of 20 miles this week, how many more miles does she need to run?

Step One:   2 x 3 = 6       Step Two:   2 + 6 = 8   

Step Three:   20 - 8 = 12   

She needs to run   12   more miles. Since the problem tells two amounts of miles that she has already run, the amount she has left to run should be less than the number of miles she set as her goal for the week. Is your answer reasonable?

Dawn has 21 candies that she wants to make into parcels of 3. She wants to give these parcels to 5 of her friends. How many parcels will she have left over?

Step One:   21 ÷ 3 = 7   

Step Three:   7 - 5 = 2   

She will have   2   parcels left over. Since she is dividing the total number of candies, the number of groups or parcels should be less than the total. Also, the number of parcels left over should be less than the total number of parcels. Is your answer reasonable?

John earned $12 on Saturday but he only managed to earn half that amount on Sunday. He earned $26 the previous weekend. How much more does he need to earn to give him the $60 he needs to buy a new hockey stick?

Step One:   12 ÷ 2 = 6       Step Two:   12 + 6 + 26 = 44   

Step Three:   60 - 44 = 16   

He needs $   16   more. Since the problem tells of three amounts of money that he has already earned, the amount still required should be less than the total amount required. Is your answer reasonable?

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Related Resources

The various resources listed below are aligned to the same standard, (4OA03) taken from the CCSM (Common Core Standards For Mathematics) as the Word problems Worksheet shown above.

Solve multistep word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole-number answers ...

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Worksheets

Multi-step

Similar to the above listing, the resources below are aligned to related standards in the Common Core For Mathematics that together support the following learning outcome:

Use the four operations with whole numbers to solve problems

 

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